July 23, 2012
I bought this on a trip to Malvern on Sunday, a piece by Joseph Knight made in 1883, signed and in the original studio frame. He has works in collections such as Tate, V&A and the Wallace. It is a haunting beautiful depiction two figures climbing Snowdonia.

I bought this on a trip to Malvern on Sunday, a piece by Joseph Knight made in 1883, signed and in the original studio frame. He has works in collections such as Tate, V&A and the Wallace. It is a haunting beautiful depiction two figures climbing Snowdonia.

4:09pm
(View comments  
Filed under: Art Etching Snowdonia Hiking 
July 13, 2012

Caer Caradoc, Shropshire - July 2012 


Caer Caradoc overlooks the town of Church Stretton and the village of All Stretton and offers panoramic views to the north towards The Wrekin, east to Wenlock Edge, and west over the nearby Long Mynd. 

The hill is volcanic in origin, like the Wrekin etc., formed of narrow ridges of resistant Pre-Cambrian rock, thrust upwards by movements deep down along the Church Stretton fault. This fault runs from Staffordshire to South Wales and can be seen on OS maps as a line of springs on this hill.
 
The summit is crowned by an Ancient British Iron Age or late Bronze Age hill fort. It is this which the hill is named after - Caer Caradog inWelsh meaning Caradog’s fort. Local legend has it that this was the site of the last stand of Caractacus against the Roman legions during the Roman conquest of Britain, and that after the battle he hid in the cave near its summit. Others say his last stand was in the locality but that this was one of his fortresses.

(Wikipedia)  

July 2, 2012

Chirk - Llangollen - Chirk by bicycle 25th July 2011

July 2, 2012
Long Mynd, Shropshire 1st July 2012

Long Mynd, Shropshire 1st July 2012

June 19, 2012

Geometric painting, working progress

6:46am
(View comments  
Filed under: Art Painting Geometric 
June 12, 2012

June 9, 2012

Geometric Painting Project 25cm x 25cm

8:12am
(View comments  
Filed under: Painting Art Geometric 
June 6, 2012
Last Wednesday I visited the University of Wolverhampton’s School of Art & Design to judge the Art Gallery prize for best work in the Fine Art degree show with head curator Marguerite Nugent. We awarded the prize to Gavin Lawley for a series of untitled concrete sculptures. The structures were very striking and evocative of ’50s and ’60s brutalist architecture. Although his practice is highly theoretical, the pieces were congratulated for their aesthetic strength and the apparent link between the form and materials, and the building they have been created and exhibited in. 
Other noted works were by artists Jodie Francesca Clarke, for her painted environment  and video works by Jo Brown and Sarah Meredith. 

Last Wednesday I visited the University of Wolverhampton’s School of Art & Design to judge the Art Gallery prize for best work in the Fine Art degree show with head curator Marguerite Nugent. 

We awarded the prize to Gavin Lawley for a series of untitled concrete sculptures. The structures were very striking and evocative of ’50s and ’60s brutalist architecture. Although his practice is highly theoretical, the pieces were congratulated for their aesthetic strength and the apparent link between the form and materials, and the building they have been created and exhibited in. 

Other noted works were by artists Jodie Francesca Clarke, for her painted environment  and video works by Jo Brown and Sarah Meredith. 

June 4, 2012
WAVE Culture Guide

Over the past 5 months I have worked with the marketing team and venue managers to produce a new piece of print which has replaced individual venue exhibitions and events guides. This is part of a wider rebranding process that the service is going through, transforming us from Wolverhampton Arts & Heritage to WAVE - Wolverhampton Arts Venues Experience. 

The new brand has been developed at a time when the service is changing rapidly.   Like many organisations, the service lost several job posts due to the end of MLA funding, but new roles are also being introduced, which changes the way we work. We are aiming to use the new branding to place the organisation in a strong position alongside our regional and national partners in this time of limited resources.
 
The WAVE culture guide has not just been a cost cutting exercise, but a chance to speak to our collective audiences in a new way. My main aim is to increase cross pollination of audiences across our venues, to introduce new experiences to people and change perceptions about what we can offer.  

It has been a challenge working with four very independent venue teams. It was important that the work represented each venues unique identities but was written with one editorial voice. We wanted a less is more approach, using strong images to tell the story balanced with clear copy. 

The next stage is the launch of the new WAVE website in mid-June which will further advocate the new branding and collective messages. I will start working on the Oct - Jan 2013 guide next month following on from feedback from staff and visitors.
 

May 17, 2012

Golden Circle Tour, Iceland May 2012

On the last day of our visit we took undoubtedly Iceland’s most popular day trip, the Golden Circle Tour which covers miles of vastly diverse landscapes, snowcapped mountains, glacial rivers and villages punctuated with must-see features along the way. 

With a storm blowing in from the interior, and talk of a blizzard catching us up further along the road, we stepped out onto our first feature, the volcanic crater Kerid and stared into its milky pool below before quickly jumping back into the van to sip from thermos flasks. 

Not much further along the road we came to the first waterfall, Faxafoss, a popular fishing spot with a wide sprawling vista and white waters prized for it’s salmon.

Gulfoss waterfalls is the most popular tourist site in Iceland, but on that day, with the wind beating down our coat collars and violently crashing water all around us we got to see the full force of Iceland’s dramatic landscape without feeling like one of the crowd.

While you can experience geothermic activity all around you in Iceland, the Geyser Centre is another popular stop on this tour. Every four minutes ‘Strokkur’ will put on a show for you, but Geyser itself is slowing down these days like it’s name might suggest. 

Þingvellir is the site of the first western democratic parliament, held yearly to bring together Viking clans from across the island to agree to common laws. Historians tell us it was a rawkus affair with an opportunity for bartering, revelry, music and storytelling, but also a time when criminals were brought to endure their gruesome punishments for the enjoyment of the baying crowds. Nowadays, the landscape is very tranquil and holds a mysterious atmospheric quality in part due to the ridges and deep clear water between the continental plates.

Looking back I feel the smaller moments of serendipitous discovery on route will be the most lasting, such as when our tour guide David pulled over to show us wild horses or when he spotted the beautiful, if slow-witted Oyster Catcher bird laying it’s mottled egg on the side of the road.

May 17, 2012

South Shore trip, Iceland May 2012

May 17, 2012

Mount Esja, Iceland May 2012

May 17, 2012

Reykjavik, Iceland May 2012

5:24am
(View comments  
Filed under: Iceland Reykjavik 
May 15, 2012
I recently made this leather knee strap for a musician friend Paul (PManasseh) who plays tuning forks as part of his music. Photo by @Diana_Jarvis 

I recently made this leather knee strap for a musician friend Paul (PManasseh) who plays tuning forks as part of his music. Photo by  

May 7, 2012

Castle Ring & Cannock Chase - 7 May 2012

(Wikipedia)  

Castle Ring is an Iron Age hill fort, situated high up on the southern edge of Cannock Chase, Staffordshire, in the village of Cannock Wood, England. Castle Ring was thought to have been occupied around AD 50, by the Celtic Cornovii tribe.